“A mother's love for her child is like nothing else in the world. It knows no law, no pity, it dares all things and crushes down remorselessly all that stands in its path." ~Agatha Christie

When it comes to these kids of mine, there’s no path I would not mow down so they could walk upon it. The world we are building is the one in which our daughters and sons will inherit. So let’s crush all the injustice and hate we can so we might hand off a kinder, safer, lovelier world than the one we inherited. Our mothers did this work before us too. Our grandmothers before them. They won battles we no longer have to fight. It is our turn to demand a world worthy of our children and their little friends.

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The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence is an annual international campaign that kicked off on the 25th of November. It’s used to call for the prevention and elimination of violence against women and girls- something it turns out, I’m quite passionate about as a sponsor of four gorgeous little Ugandan girls.
 
As a Mum to three kids myself, I feel sick when I think about children around the world who don’t have access to the same things mine do. Simple stuff like food, clean water, a safe place to sleep and medical care. That’s not ok with me. And I think that’s why I love child sponsorship so much because it does everything it can to give a child their childhood back. It says to a kid living in poverty, don’t worry. Don’t worry about your schooling, your food, your medical care anymore. We have your back. It gives them a safe place (their local church project) to go and be a child, a place where they can share burdens they have and get justice if, Lord forbid, they ever need it. It’s their haven. The best part of their week.

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Poverty and violence comes to steal, to rob, to kill and destroy. It tells a child you will never get out of this. Child sponsorship is one very important antidote to that. It says, no. Not on my watch. I see you. I hear you. And I might not live next to you or even in the same country as you, but I’m going to play the long game and walk with you until you graduate school and can go off on your own. As child sponsors we stand in holy defiance and righteous anger and play a significant part in pushing back the potential darkness of poverty and violence over a child’s life.

If you sponsor a child with Tearfund, your Compassion child is known, loved and protected. They are surrounded by staff that listen and care about them. They educate and advocate and go into bat for your kids if it’s ever needed.  We bring in the funds, the local staff do the implementing. Their model is one child living in poverty is linked to one individual living in a country like New Zealand that is able to support that particular child. I love that Compassion is child focused, Christ centred and church based.

Sponsor a child with Tearfund already? Thank you ever so much for playing your part. Open to it? We’d love to chat.

I know this planet feels so harsh and cruel, but it has met its match with a generation who didn't come to play.


#16daysofactivism
 

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